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    Description

    The only known lumber from the top ace of Murderer's Row

    1926-27 Waite Hoyt Game Used Bat, PSA/DNA GU 7.5. If Lou Gehrig labored in the shadow of of Babe Ruth, then the Yankees pitching staff was bathed in a full solar eclipse during those Golden Age seasons that Ruth, Gehrig and Tony Lazzeri opened the long ball floodgates upon the American League. It's a reasonable symptom of sharing a dugout with the greatest sluggers in the history of the sport. But a quick review of the stats indicates that the defensive half of Miller Huggins' equation was every bit the equal of the offense in 1927, allowing a League-low 605 runs, over one hundred fewer than the White Sox' second-place effort. Leading all American League pitchers during that fabled 1927 World Championship campaign was Waite Hoyt, whose twenty-two and seven record rates among the finest ever executed in pinstripes. A Game One victory in the 1927 World Series sweep was Hoyt's exclamation point.

    Presented is a signature model Hanna SA #31 bat dating to either this season or the pennant-winning campaign that preceded it, a staggeringly rare relic that survives as the only known game used Waite Hoyt gamer ever to surface. While pitchers' bats have always bedeviled collectors, all but the most brazenly optimistic had long since abandoned hope of Hoyt ownership, until now.

    Leading bat expert John Taube is able to pinpoint the vintage of this singular relic to a two-season span by the "S.A." designation in the trademark, indicative of Southern Ash construction, used only during the first two years of Hanna's bat production before transitioning to the superior Northern Ash that would characterize all post-1927 models. Taube notes in his included letter of examination that Hoyt's facsimile signature on the barrel assures the bat belonged to Hoyt himself, as no pitchers ever appeared among the company's endorsers of retail models.

    Taube characterizes the bat's use as "heavy," noting a handle crack that originates somewhere beneath the vintage tape that covers eleven and a half inches of its length. This tape is original to Hoyt's use, however, and was applied to enhance grip, and not to secure the crack (though a couple inches of tape applied for that purpose above the grip tape have since been removed). Multiple ball marks and stitch impressions are evident on the barrel, as are a scattering of green bat rack streaks, common to American League gamers of this era. Length is thirty-four and a half inches, weight thirty-three and a half ounces.

    As a one-of-a-kind artifact that straddles a line between two of the most fervent collecting bases in the hobby--game used bats and New York Yankees--this is a piece certain to spark fireworks when its time on the auction block arrives. LOA from PSA/DNA, GU 7.5.





    1926-27 Waite Hoyt Game Used Bat, PSA/DNA GU 7.5.




    *A donation of $100 to the American Red Cross is required to attend the Live auction.



    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    February, 2013
    23rd-24th Saturday-Sunday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 6
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 932

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